Inside Out

This page has been downloaded from www.insideout.net.

It is photocopiable, but all copies must be complete pages. Copyright © Macmillan Publishers Limited 2009.

Gadgets WORKSHEET A

Dave: I see you’ve still got your brick, Ken.

Ken: My what?

Dave: Your brick. Your 1990s mobile. Isn’t it too heavy to carry?

Ken: Ha ha, very funny. It still works fine, you know. It’s not the latest

model, like yours, but unlike you I know I don’t need a mobile phone

that can take pictures or access the internet. I don’t need to check my

emails when I’m on the bus, and nor do you. No one does. Did you feel

your life was empty before they invented the phone you have now? Of

course you didn’t.

Dave: You’re a dinosaur, Ken. Don’t you think technology’s a good thing?

Ken: That depends. Some stuff’s really useful, like the high tech equipment

in hospitals that saves people’s lives, but as for the electronic gadgets

people buy in the shops these days, most of them are so unnecessary.

Satnav, for example – why do I need a computer to tell me where I am

when I’m driving? I can read a map. I can even stop and ask another

human being.

Dave: I find satnav very handy. It saves time.

Ken: I bet it’s never saved you more than five minutes. You love wasting

your money, don’t you?

Dave: You won’t want to know what I bought at the weekend, then?

Ken: A phone that can make you breakfast?

Dave: No, an e-book reader. It’s amazing. It stores the words of hundreds of

books electronically, and you can just hold it in your hands. Now I can

have my whole book collection right there in front of me.

Ken: So can I. On the bookshelves in my house.

Dave: No, but with an e-book reader you can access any of your books at the

touch of a button.

Ken: And I can access any of my books by getting off the sofa and walking

about three metres. It’s not difficult, and it’s a lot cheaper.

Dave: Oh, Ken, you just don’t understand.

Ken: No, you’re right, I don’t.

Inside Out

This page has been downloaded from www.insideout.net.

It is photocopiable, but all copies must be complete pages. Copyright © Macmillan Publishers Limited 2009.

Gadgets WORKSHEET B

Exercise 1

Answer the questions below.

1. What do you think Dave means when he jokes that Ken’s mobile phone is a

‘brick’?

2. How old does Dave say Ken’s mobile is?

3. What word does Ken use to describe the electronic gadgets people buy in the shops

these days?

4. What example of useful technology does Ken give?

5. What two things does Ken suggest people who are driving can do instead of using

sat nav?

6. Ken jokes that Dave has bought something that doesn’t really exist – what is it?

7. What did Dave really buy at the weekend?

8. Where does Ken say his whole book collection is?

9. What do you think Dave means when he calls Ken a ‘dinosaur’?

10. What do you think Ken means when he says at the end of the conversation that he

doesn’t understand?

Exercise 2

Decide whether the following statements are true (T) or false (F), or if the text doesn’t

say (D).

1. Dave has a mobile phone.

2. Ken would like to have a camera on his mobile.

3. Dave often travels by bus.

4. Ken can drive a car.

5. Ken doesn’t believe sat nav saves Dave much time.

6. Dave is unhappy with his new e-book reader.

7. Ken would like an e-book reader too.

8. Dave lives in a house, not a flat.

Inside Out

This page has been downloaded from www.insideout.net.

It is photocopiable, but all copies must be complete pages. Copyright © Macmillan Publishers Limited 2009.

Gadgets WORKSHEET C

Exercise 3

The dialogue from Worksheet A has been copied below but the words in bold have

been mixed up – can you put them back in the right places again?

Dave: I see you’ve still got your brick, Ken.

Ken: My what?

Dave: Your brick. Your 1990s (1) amazing. Isn’t it too (2) invented to carry?

Ken: Ha ha, very funny. It still (3) sofa fine, you know. It’s not the latest

model, like yours, but unlike you I know I don’t need a mobile phone

that can take pictures or (4) read the internet. I don’t need to

(5) handy my emails when I’m on the bus, and nor do you. No one

does. Did you feel your life was empty before they (6) works the phone

you have now? Of course you didn’t.

Dave: You’re a dinosaur, Ken. Don’t you think technology’s a good thing?

Ken: That depends. Some stuff’s really useful, like the (7) access equipment

in hospitals that saves people’s lives, but as for the electronic gadgets

people buy in the shops these days, most of them are so unnecessary.

Sat nav, for example – why do I need a (8) heavy to tell me where I am

when I’m driving? I can (9) No a map. I can even stop and ask another

human (10) wasting.

Dave: I find sat nav very (11) breakfast. It saves time.

Ken: I bet it’s never saved you more than five minutes. You love

(12) high-tech your money, don’t you?

Dave: You won’t want to know what I bought at the weekend, then?

Ken: A phone that can make you (13) being?

Dave: No, an (14) computer reader. It’s (15) button. It stores the words of

hundreds of books electronically, and you can just hold it in your hands.

Now I can have my whole book (16) mobile right there in front of me.

Ken: So can I. On the (17) check in my house.

Dave: No, but with an e-book reader you can access any of your books at the

touch of a (18) e-book.

Ken: And I can access any of my books by getting off the (19) collection and

walking about three metres. It’s not difficult, and it’s a lot cheaper.

Dave: Oh, Ken, you just don’t understand.

Ken: (20) bookshelves, you’re right, I don’t.

 

Inside Out

This page has been downloaded from www.insideout.net. It is photocopiable, but all copies must be complete pages.

Copyright © Macmillan Publishers Limited 2009. Definitions from the Macmillan English Dictionary 2nd Edition © Macmillan

Publishers Limited 2007 and the Macmillan Essential Dictionary © Macmillan Publishers Limited 2003

www.macmillandictionaries.com

Gadgets - Glossary

access verb

to get information, especially from a computer

The database allows you to access the sales

figures.

amazing adjective

used about something surprising that is also very

impressive

I think you are doing an amazing job with those

children.

as for

used for introducing a subject that is related to

what you have just been talking about

As for the children, they were happy enough to

spend all day on the beach.

at the touch of a button phrase

if a machine works at the touch of a button, it

works extremely quickly and easily

Customers can buy and sell shares at the touch of

a button.

brick noun

a block used for building walls and other structures

He laid every brick himself.

check verb

to examine someone or something in order to find

out if something is present

Have you checked your email?

[it/that] depends verb

used when you cannot give a definite answer,

because different things are possible in different

situations

dinosaur noun [count]

someone or something that is very old-fashioned

and no longer useful or effective

e-book noun [count]

a book published on the Internet

electronic adjective

involving the use of electronic equipment,

especially computers

an electronic voting system

equipment noun [uncount]

the tools, machines, or other things that you need

for a particular job or activity

camping/lifting/safety equipment

high tech adjective

using the most modern or advanced technology

available, especially electronic equipment and

computers

high tech computer companies

handy adjective

useful

a handy electronic diary

invent verb

to design or create something such as a machine or

process that did not exist before

Alfred Nobel invented dynamite.

latest adjective

most recent, or newest

his latest novel

mobile [phone] noun [count]

a small phone that you can carry around with you.

model noun [count]

a particular type of vehicle or machine that a

company makes

Fiat launched a new model last week.

satnav noun [uncountable]

satellite navigation: a system for finding the best

way to a place using information from satellites. It

is often found in cars.

save someone’s life phrase

to stop someone from dying

A man who was passing saved her life by pulling

her out of the water.

store verb

to save information in electronic form, for example

in a computer’s memory

The design can be stored on floppy disk.

technology noun

advanced scientific knowledge used for practical

purposes, especially in industry

computer/software/military technology

waste verb [transitive]

to use more of something than is necessary, or to

use it in a way that does not produce the best

results

 

 

 

 

Распечатать | Автор: verbinskaya-nv | Дата: 24-01-2011, 21:23


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